Highland Hill Farm Po. Box 517 Fountainville, PA 18923 215-345-0946

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The Reel Deals Are At Highland Hill Farm ......Adventures With Billy!!!

Dove Hunt in Argentina Feb 2008


In Feb of 2008 I went to Argentina with my buddies Doc, Dave, and John. This was my second trip to the Paco Riestra Resort for Dove Hunting. We were not disappointed!
The Big Four With Kills


Argentina is one of the finest bird hunting destinations in the world. Paco's Cordoba region alone boasts 30,000,000 doves, which offers the perfect conditions for hunters looking for non-stop, red-hot barrel action shooting!


Taking aim... Billy


To compliment the dove shooting action,Paco offers combination hunts, where you will enjoy a couple days of dove hunting, a couple of days of pigeon hunting. You can also decide to focus your trip on doves or pigeons for the duration of your stay.


Large Pigdeons Killed By Billy Doc Having Fun


After an exciting day of hunting, you will find excellent, first class accommodations, along with delicious food and Argentine wines.


Doc Ready to go Hunting John Shooting Doves Sunflowers damaged by Doves More damage by  Doves Big Four and end of the Hunt

Plants and Trees At The Paco Riestra Resort

Cactus Blooming at Night


The native vegetation of Argentina varies greatly with the different climate and topographical zones of the country. The warm and moist northeastern area supports tropical plants, including such trees as the palm, rosewood, lignum vitae, jacaranda, and red quebracho (a source of tannin). Grasses are the principal variety of native vegetation in the Pampas. Trees, excluding such imported drought-resistant varieties as the eucalyptus, sycamore, and acacia, are practically nonexistent in this region and in most of Patagonia. The chief types of vegetation in Patagonia are herbs, shrubs, grasses, and brambles.


Cactus in Daylight Hours Plants at the Resort Plants at the Resort Plants at the Resort Plants at the Resort Home
Remember... Bill's Bartering For Just About Anything

If you have items that you want to get rid of we may be able to help. There are many items that we can use on our farms that we can recycle or give away. We will even barter for valuable items with trees and plants that we raise.

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Reserve a Boulder!!! Click Here!!!


Trades Wanted

This April we are having a special bartering option....We need help planting 20,000 seedlings and plant liners at our Milan Pa Nursery. We would like to offer the following trade...Help us plant some of our trees and plant seedlings and spend some time hunting for arrowheads on our property. You could also take home some plants...we won't miss afew....
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We are always looking to trade nursery stock and seedlings for your surplus. We even have many landscape boulders that we can swap with. You could also do some hauling for us in return for stock or access to go hunting, fishing, camping, we will not be insulted by your offers!!!. Email us with your surplus materials. We may be able to make trades. We are serious about trading and swapping.

Examples of items we need:

Construction materials and equipment...doors, windows, boards, hardware
Plumbing supplies...pvc pipe and fittings, pumps, heaters, copper pipes and fittings
Hunting and fishing gear...ammo, reels, rods, tackle, boats, canoes, paddles
Snakes...Click here to read why!!!!

Hand tools...saws, drills, hand power tools, blades cuttershammers, wrenches, tool boxes
Farm implements...out door power equipment, tractors, wagons, fertilizers, pesticides, used cans of oils and lubs
Farm supplies...shovels, rakes, farm bells, an anvil, blacksmithing tools, generators
Fencing materials such as woven wire and split rail fencing, fence chargers, barbed wire, wire, nails, nuts, bolts, surplus pavers,
Palletized stone, field stone, flagstones, rocks, boulders
Household items such as wooden furniture, tables chairs, cabinets and dressers
Livestock..pigs, goats, cows, donkeys, chickens, peacocks, sorry no sheep(I don't trust myself with them).

We have registered with the Pa Dept. of Environmental Resources as a place where you can drop off your unwanted items such as old tools, tractors, plumbing and construction supplies, farm implements, fencing materials, usable nuts and bolts.... well you have the picture, things we can use around our farms. If we can't use them maybe we can send it on to someone else that can???? We are always looking to trade nursery stock and seedlings for your surplus. Email us with your surplus materials. We may be able to make trades.

I once put an ad in the paper that said, "If it's free it's for me". I had to stop the add because I collected so much stuff. Ads do work. The problem with this ad was it was not specific enough to target what I was looking for. Over time and years I then started to swap and barter the free stuff that I got for things I really wanted. I had hundreds of broken lawn mowers and hundreds of gallons of old unwanted paint. I had enough paint to dip a house if needed. Disposal now became an issue. Thus I came up with the idea of trading and barter.

Now I did not invent this wheel but I had enough of them that it appeared I might have. So barter has become a means of swapping and exchanging my surpluses for other people's surpluses. Since I am in the nursery business I also have plants that are surplus. I may plant 1000 trees expecting to need 1000 and find that I have 500 more than what I need. So offering these trees on the web for barter has been an effective means to move dormant inventory. Besides this is a great way to meet new customers. When they have surpluses and I can move their dormant stock, we both win. Here is a sample ad that I ran on my web site seedlingsrus.com :

I once put an ad in the paper that said, "If it's free it's for me". I had to stop the add because I collected so much stuff. Ads do work. The problem with this ad was it was not specific enough to target what I was looking for. Over time and years I then started to swap and barter the free stuff that I got for things I really wanted. I had hundreds of broken lawn mowers and hundreds of gallons of old unwanted paint. I had enough paint to dip a house if needed. Disposal now became an issue. Thus I came up with the idea of trading and barter.

Now I did not invent this wheel but I had enough of them that it appeared I might have. So barter has become a means of swapping and exchanging my surpluses for other people's surpluses. Since I am in the nursery business I also have plants that are surplus. I may plant 1000 trees expecting to need 1000 and find that I have 500 more than what I need. So offering these trees on the web for barter has been an effective means to move dormant inventory. Besides this is a great way to meet new customers. When they have surpluses and I can move their dormant stock, we both win.

IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO SIGN UP FOR OUR E-NEWSLETTER. MEMBERS RECEIVE MORE AND BIGGER DISCOUNTS PLUS OUR NEWS LETTER IS INFORMATIVE..... SIGN-UP NOW ....

Join the Highland Hill Farm E-Newsletter
Email:

Regular Fieldstone

Heavy Fieldstone

>Heavy Steppers

Small Boulders...$155 per pallet

Large Boulders...$155 per pallet with a single boulder

Globe Arborvitae

Green Giant Arbs Available That are ready for trade or sale

Deer Resistant Green Mountain Boxwoods for Sale or Trade

Potted Blue Rug Junipers Ready for sale or Trade

6' Green Giant arborvitae

I once had a real job. Mr Putman at a Doylestown company hired me when I had just gotten married many years ago, I think it's about 28 or 29 years back, and while there I must say I learned from him one of the most important lessons in life. Try always to say yes, you can always say no, but you can't always say yes.

Why We Say Yes

As you might know, I love to barter. Not because it is profitable, but because it is fun and money is really worthless, it goes down in value every day. One day a customer of mine who was about the same age as me, fiftyish, came up to me and offered me a deal. He wanted about ten 6 foot white pine trees and needed us to plant them. He wanted me to hire his father to work off the cost of the trees and the planting for his labor. He really wanted a job to keep his father busy. Without hesitation, thinking of Mr. Putman, I blurted out, "Yes". I had that uncomfortable feeling you get when you suspect that you just succeeded in opening Pandora's Box. His father slowly, and I mean slowly, got out of a car and over a period of 2 minutes set up his walker. He was about 85 years old and had just recovered from breaking his back after climbing up a tree and falling. He could not stand up long and announced that he needed to sit down a lot. Along with the walker, he had a cane and when he talked he kept pointing with the cane and using it as an extension of his hand to help him communicate. He was a little hard of hearing so we had to speak slowing and clearly to him. He had a heavy Hungarian accent. I thought, well, at least he ain't blind, Mr Putman I hope you're proud of me saying Yes!!!

I asked the old man, Mr. Horvath, what kind of work he used to do. To my surprise he said he had a Ph.D. in horticulture and had been the head of the Horticulture Department at a University in Illinois. I knew immediately that here was a real source of knowledge. Boy, was this something we could use around here. I had an immediate idea on how to use Dr. Horvath. I said to him, "How about teaching my boys a hands on course in plant propagation this summer?" My son Jamie was just 16, and Mike and our neighbor Paul (who has been with us since he was in kindergarten) were 13 and could really benefit from lessons from someone other than me. Besides, Dr. Horvath has far greater and deeper knowledge than I will ever hope to have. So that was the beginning of one of my best trades. The boys set up a school on the farm. They converted a greenhouse into a classroom. Only there were no blackboards. Instead they put in plant propagation tables. Dr Horvath supervised the boys from his chair and told them what he needed in the way of tables and benches. He had them obtain vermiculite, perlite, sand, peat moss and other media for growing plants. His ideas were simple and he proceed to show the boys how to make rooted cuttings. Dr. Horvath had them test growing rooted cuttings in various blends of media using different types of plants. This way, each day, the boys could see how media affected plant growth using the scientific method of comparing one media vs. another in a side by side study. Each day during the summer, for 6 hours a day the boys were at school with Dr. Horvath. When the boys would go to lunch, Dr. Horvath would go with them. A trip to McDonalds can be a lesson in horticulture. As they would slowly go in Dr. Horvath would tell them about the nursery stock at McDonalds. Of course it was not all education, Dr. Horvath knew how to keep up their interest. They would take time to go fishing at our pond and while there Dr. Horvath would tell them about propagation of aquatic plants and wetland plants while fishing. Can you imagine, going fishing is actually a way to teach the kids about plants? I will always remember the crew cab pickup truck going down our farm lane with 3 shotguns and a cane sticking out the windows and Doc Horvath telling them about rabbit and rodent controls in a nursery. By the end of the summer my boys would do anything for Dr. Horvath. He was like a grandfather to them. The course was a success, not just because the boys learned about plants, but because they learned to love learning. They knew that colleges would have more Dr. Horvaths. Wow, thank you Mr. Putman, I am glad I said ...Yes.

Sometimes people take me up on my offers to trade trees and shrubs for their products. One such person is Ralph. Ralph has a farm in Ohio and raises a variety of farm animals and draft horses. He asked if I would be interested in trading trees and plants for his pigs, a Boarder Collie puppy, or his sheep. Not baaaad I thought. Never really trusting myself with sheep, I opted for the puppy and some piglets. Here is what Ralph said after our trade.....

Bill and Marjorie,

Thank you for a great time, the landscape stuff, some great conversation and for having faith in 2 people that you've never met. Your boys are real gentlemen and good guys to be around. You must be proud. Your operation is top shelf. Thank you for taking me up on my proposal and our barter deal, you were more than fair.

We wish you continued success in all your endeavors.. you are honest gutsy people... I like that! Thank you for letting us get to know you. Stay in touch. Thanks again for everything,

Ralph & Connie

Ps Check out my "Reflections" at the following website Click Here

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As you can see I identify what I want to trade for and ask for items that fit into our operations. I like to include a testimonial as it gives a link that can be verified as to the realness of my trading. I also have a newsletter that I post to my email letter so each month I can tell people what I just traded for. Here is part of my most recent email newsletter:

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During this month of January we are offering a 10% discount on our gift cards and coupons. We help make your gift bigger. Don't forget that we will also trade for your surplus inventory, building materials, sports equipment, plumbing and ag equipment. We need all kinds of materials on our farms and ranches. You can't insult me with your offers, so go ahead...call us.....This is how we just got our dog Sweep...a Boarder Collie.....2 pigs....boxes of old tools......a John Deer riding tractor......a bunch of used but in new condition windows and doors....a couple of buckets of nuts, bolts, and nails (some bent but that's ok) and a even a hind quarter of a fresh road kill deer!!

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I started this story for you quite a few months ago and it has sat about 80% finished for quite awhile. Well, now it's done: I can honestly say that I am the Son of Monty Hall. During World War II, my father volunteered to serve in the "AAF," the Army Air Force as it was called before a separate distinct Air Force service branch was created). He was told his eyes failed the color-blindness test. So he volunteered for another "airborne" duty, and got to at least ride in planes, for a while anyway, by joining the paratroopers. Interestingly, so-called color-blindness is very common. About 1 out of 12 men, that's about 8%, all over the world, are color-blind. For women it's much more rare, only about 1 out of 250 are affected. Color-blindness really only involves two colors, it sounds like a much more serious problem than it is. Proteronopia and deuteronopia are the two general forms, they both involve "misreading" the colors red or green. Proteronopes see all different reds as the same dull gray, or dull tan. Alternatively, reds and greens appear the same to deuteronopes. Now you know why all traffic lights in the U. S. were quickly standardized with red on top and green on the bottom. Additionally, did you ever notice the bluish tinge used when older traffic signal lights are replaced. That's to help "color blind" drivers... Well, dad never knew about any of this until he joined the Army. Because of his background in electronics he was assigned to be his regiment's "OSS liaison" when the paratroopers were dropped behind the enemy's front lines. The Office of Strategic Services, the clandestine spy guys of WWII, required the use of false identities. Beyond giving him a mere "call sign" or "handle," the OSS officer established the persona of "Montgomery Hall." Maybe the officer was a fan of the rising actor at that time Montgomery Clift. Maybe "Monty of Alemain," the British General Bernard Montgomery, was the source. So friends, I can honestly say, "My dad was Monty Hall wa-a-a-ay before "Let's Make a Deal." (And "Truth or Consequences," which I mentioned in the historical description of Doylestown, and which gave its name to the town where we now have two large ranches, The Elephant Butte Lake Ranch, and the Flying X. Ranch) ******************************************************************** Now you know what and why I want to barter and trade. Its in my blood. I am the Son of Monty Hall.




Please Visit Dan Ball Machinery and Mower Repair

Please Visit James Neys Snowplowing services

Check out Our Hunting and Recreational Opportunties

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Link To us

Create a link to Highland Hill Farm from your web site and become one of our affiliates. Our affiliates always receive special discounts when you stop in to our nurseries. We will also create a back link to your web site and advertise your products and services using our extensive web marketing programs which are free to our link affiliates.

Copy and Paste the Following Text to Your Web Pages

<a href="http://www.Seedlingsrus.com" target="_blank" ><img src="http://seedlingsrus.com/highlandhillfarmbanner.gif" width="150" height="150" border="0"></a>

It is really simple to create a link. After all I was able to copy and paste this text and I am not a rocket scientist. Links are as important to your site as to mine. We can help each other. Bill Hirst Email Us We deliver to the following counties in Pa:
Adams County, Clinton County, Lackawanna County, Pike County Allegheny County, Columbia County, Lancaster County, Potter County Armstrong County, Crawford County, Lawrence County, Schuylkill County Beaver County, Cumberland County, Lebanon County, Snyder County Bedford County, Dauphin County, Lehigh County, Somerset County Berks County, Delaware County, Luzerne County, Sullivan County Blair County, Elk County, Lycoming County, Susquehanna County Bradford County, Erie County, McKean County, Tioga County Bucks County, Fayette County, Mercer County, Union County Butler County, Forest County, Mifflin County, Venango County Cambria County, Franklin County, Monroe County, Warren County Cameron County, Fulton County, Montgomery County, Washington County Carbon County, Greene County, Montour County, Wayne County Centre County, Huntingdon County, Northampton County, Westmoreland County Chester County, Indiana County, Northumberland County, Wyoming County Clarion County, Jefferson County, Perry County, York County Clearfield County, Juniata County, Philadelphia County
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